Trivial Insults and Jokes

Authorities persecuting insulting comments on Facebook and Twitter


 

Offsite Article: Dorset Police Censorship...


Link Here 3rd August 2012
Full story: Trivial Insults and Jokes...Authorities persecuting insulting comments on Facebook and Twitter
The arrest of the Tom Daley tweeter was not an isolated act by idle coppers -- it was part of today's sweeping culture of intolerance. By Brendan O'Neill See article from blogs.telegraph.co.uk

 

 

Trivial Tweets: Pandering to the Easily Offended...

Can't the ombudsman just say no for once


Link Here 3rd August 2012
Full story: Trivial Insults and Jokes...Authorities persecuting insulting comments on Facebook and Twitter

A complaint has been made to a PC watchdog about a councillor accused of suggesting on Twitter that a woman turn to prostitution to earn money.

According to the Western Mail, Carmarthenshire councillor John Jenkins responded to a female Twitter user who said she needed to earn money quickly by writing:

Prostitution? On a serious note, good money in being in an escort.

Jenkins, who represents Elli in Llanelli as an independent, said:

Someone has obviously gone to a lot of effort to trawl through an archive of my private communications to find something that they can take out of context to make me look bad. Continue reading the main story Start Quote

In no way can private banter between friends, none of which were offended by the obvious tongue-in-cheek banter, be considered offensive.

He said he had been the subject of a vexatious, politically-motivated complaint and looked forward to explaining it to the ombudsman if the watchdog thinks there is a case to answer.

A spokeswoman for the Public Services Ombudsman confirmed a complaint had been made. She said it would be considered before a decision is taken whether to launch a formal investigation.

 

 

Update: Police Don't Need New Laws for Twitter...

But it's us that need new laws to preserve free speech


Link Here 5th August 2012
Full story: Trivial Insults and Jokes...Authorities persecuting insulting comments on Facebook and Twitter

Twitter should take action as quickly as possible to deal with supposed abuse on its website, according to a senior police officer.

Stuart Hyde, chief constable of Cumbria police who speaks on e-crime for the Association of Chief Police Officers, said it was right for police to intervene in cases of bullying on twitter.

Asked if new laws were needed, Hyde told BBC Radio 4's Today programme:

No, I think we have got quite a lot of legislation, dating back to the Malicious Communications Acts of 1998 and 2003. There is a lot there that helps us and gives us the power to do stuff.

This is a new technology, a new way of communicating, it has grown exponentially. There hasn't been separate legislation, so we are using legislation that wasn't particularly created for this, but it works reasonably well most of the time.

We are learning from it, there are things that have sometimes gone wrong and I think sometimes it is important that we make sure we provide the service people need.

If people come to us and say 'I am really upset, I've been offended, my life has been made a misery and I want somebody to do something about it', then yes the police should, whenever possible, try to help.

I don't want police officers dragged off the streets to deal with frivolous complaints. Where these complaints are pretty serious, then it is quite right that we should intervene, and we do that.

It is important to look at the whole context. It is not just about one tweet, it is a whole range of tweets.

Look at what the individual has done -- is this a concerted attempt to have a go at one individual in a way that passes the threshold for offences against the law? If it is, then clearly we should intervene and do something to stop it.

But Hyde said that police have so far not received large numbers of complaints about abusive Twitter messages.

 

 

Justice not seen to being done...

Rank and file police in the UK are frustrated about being assign to sort out internet insults rather than burglary


Link Here 24th September 2018
Full story: Trivial Insults and Jokes...Authorities persecuting insulting comments on Facebook and Twitter

The new head of the Police Federation John Apter, who represents 120,000 rank and file officers across England and Wales, has said his members were incredibly frustrated because they have been assigned to sorting out social media spats rather than tackling more serious crimes like burglary.

The new head explained that while resourcing remained the main issue facing policing, there was also a lack of common sense when it came to priorities.

Last week it emerged that Yorkshire Police had asked people to report insults on social media, even if they were not considered to be a hate crime. Other forces have been criticised recently for using computer programmes rather than experienced officers to decide whether a burglary is worth investigating. Such initiatives have led to criticism of the police and the observation that the service is out of touch with the public.

But Apter said nobody was more frustrated than police officers when they were prevented from attending burglaries and other serious crimes. Burglary is one of the most intrusive, horrible crimes that a householder can go through. It makes you feel incredibly vulnerable, but people can sometimes wait days for a police response, Apter said.

 


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